Tag Archives: Reproductive rights

What My Heart Beats For Trumps The Heartbeat Bill

8 Dec

“It’s a new day, but it all feels old
It’s a good life, that’s what I’m told…”

To quote Good Charolotte, this is precisely how I feel with the controversy surrounding our next POTUS, mainly his stance on abortion, and silly government officials like Janet Porter who are encroaching on MY bodily autonomy.

Republicans would just love to defund planned parenthood, and voted last year that birth control should be available only OTC, and are also attempting to make abortions illegal except in cases of rape, incest and maternal mortality (oh wait, Janet Porter’s Heartbeat Bill even scoffs at those ‘exceptions’). This is taking away freedoms from women and making reproductive health less accessible.

I don’t know about you, but this makes me feel like a second class citizen in this patriarchal government. If you don’t like or support abortion…don’t have one! But please, do not think you can have the audacity to also make my choice for me.

To the men who think women shouldn’t have sex: sorry but some of us really enjoy sex, and protect ourselves against pregnancy. What about all the guys who bitch about condoms being uncomfortable? And it’s easy for a man to tell me to carry my baby to term and give it up for adoption. Is he the one paying for doctor visits? Missed days at work? Or hospital stays? Or the one forced to deal with the psychological trauma? I. Don’t. Think.So. But I know there are so many middle-aged males who will disagree.

I assume anyone who aligns themselves with the pro-life argument will never opt for an abortion, however if your leanings are pro-choice you do not wish to force your beliefs on other sentient human beings, you just wish for the opportunity to choose your own path. Current legislation allows for this, would it be better to allow an outspoken minority (according to statistics) to force their wishes on people they do not know, living through situations they probably have never experienced themselves?

Aborting a child is nothing to be proud of, but it is not in my mind something to be shameful of either. If you take every precaution to prevent a pregnancy and by chance end up becoming pregnant, why should you have to keep it? Just because it has the potential to become a living person? If someone is financially or emotionally insecure to care for a child how would it be fair to bring a child into the world that might grow up disadvantaged?

Medically speaking, abortion is not murder because the fetus is attached to the mother – if the mother dies, the fetus dies. Moreover, a baby has no consciousness until it is near 5 months of age. I understand it has a heartbeat at 8 weeks, but if no memories or self awareness can be formed while in utero I don’t see how damaging abortion can be to a child that is not aware of its own existence.

Are you republicans aware of the massive tax increases it would take and social programs to ensure these children become productive members of society? I don’t see ANY commitment from pro lifers to step up after the baby is born.

I do propose however that Trump Tower should be turned into a free daycare, and Janet Porter can spend her days serving apple juice and animal crackers to all the newborns she plans to help raise.

Why Fetal Fascist Carly Fiorina is a Threat to Women

17 Sep

“If women want any rights more than they’s got, why don’t they just take them, and not be talking about it.”

– Sojourner Truth

 

Capture

Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

I wanted to keep this post professional, but there’s something about other people wanting to dictate what choices I am “allowed” to make for my own body that really makes my blood boil.

A universal sustainable development includes gender equality and ensuring sexual and reproductive health and rights are protected. Unfortunately, it is issues that fall under this umbrella, such as reducing maternal mortality and birth control/abortion access that constrain female independence and freedom, control over their own bodies, sexuality and childbearing that deny personal life choices and opportunities regarding education and careers.

Not only in the United States, but around the world, women and girls face very real barriers concerning equality (wage gaps, gender-based violence, genital mutilation, etc.) but the poor and socially disadvantaged become further ostracized.

GOP candidate and pro-life advocate Carly Fiorina is a threat to eradicating poverty and achieving that sustainable development which I see as possible through gender equality including women’s rights, health and empowerment.

Fiorina’s plan to cut contraception access and limit it to over-the-counter would likely lead to higher, not lower abortion rates. And although she only believes in abortion for circumstances of rape, maternal mortality and incest, women who want to terminate pregnancies will find a way – and it will be detrimental and dangerous. I assume she wouldn’t want to be responsible for an underground abortion ring, but it looks like that’s what she could breed.

While I am pro-choice, I do not mind those who favor a pro-life stance, and I do have opinions on aborting a fetus over 20 weeks. However, reproductive rights ARE human rights and Carly nor anyone else should ever be able to dictate what another woman chooses to do with her body.

I just can’t seem to find any rationale on how limiting access to birth control and abortions will be beneficial. Fiorina also continues to blast Planned Parenthood as a callous and brutal organization, however many women depend on PP. Perhaps instead of defunding PP, maybe we should develop better ways of managing its practices?

All in all I think Carly is a woman who needs to feel important, yearns to be relevant and enjoys challenging the status quo just for the hell of it.

Abortion vs Reproductive Freedom

28 Sep

abortion-sign

I was having one of those mornings where everything infuriates me, which happens to include the group of pro-life ralliers gathered outside the hospital on my street–proudly shouting and poking their picket signs at me. If I wasn’t already running late to work, I would have pulled over and gave them an earful.  I think what angers me most about the debate on abortion is the people who fail to realize that it is not only about a woman’s right to choose, but also the conditions of women’s liberation.

There is a great article by Susan Sherwin called Abortion Through a Feminist Ethics Lens.

Feminist analysis of abortion differs from most other perspectives because feminist analysis focuses on how the woman got pregnant. Sherwin points out that the pro-life movements have argued that women can avoid unwanted pregnancies by simply avoiding sexual intercourse. Sherwin believes that currently and historically women sometimes have little control over their sex lives, and therefore have little control over the decision to become pregnant. She adds that women are often subject to rape by strangers and those known to them. She says sexual coercion is a common practice, and often isn’t even realized by the woman.

Feminists are not concerned only with free access to abortions, but they are also concerned with the factors that make women choose to abort a wanted fetus. An example of these factors would be a lack of financial and social supports.

Sherwin’s most successful argument, I found, discusses the feminist view of the fetus. As the debate currently stands a competition has been established between the rights of the women and the value of the fetus. In the feminist perspective the value of the fetus is relational rather than absolute.  This argument is important in that it deals with the age old debate of what is more important, the rights of the woman, or the right of the fetus she is carrying. The feminist perspective argues that what is valued about persons is not existence, but instead personality. Therefore fetuses must not be viewed as morally significant because they have not developed sufficiently in a social relationship.

Sherwin adds that feminists are not pro-abortion. Instead they support reproductive freedom, which she defines as “the condition under which women are able to make truly voluntary choices about their reproductive lives”.

It is my hope that men and women alike realize that abortion is deeper than simply a black or white choice; There are grays in between, and while they may  be easy for some to dismiss, they must never be discounted.